demand-side management

Synonyms

DSM,

Definition

Demand side management focuses on the idea that whatever doesn’t have to be use at peak times (morning and evening highs) should be programmed to run at a later time (a washing machine). This would reduce peak loads often supplied by peak load boilers running on more expensive and less sustainable fuel.

Policies and programmes for influencing the demand for goods and/or services. In the energy sector, DSM aims at reducing the demand for electricity and energy sources. DSM helps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. (IPCC)

Demand side management focuses on the idea that whatever doesn?t have to be use at peak times (morning and evening highs) should be programmed to run at a later time (a washing machine). This would reduce peak loads often supplied by peak load boilers running on more expensive and less sustainable fuel.

Wikipedia definition:

Energy demand management, also known as demand-side management (DSM) or demand-side response (DSR), is the modification of consumer demand for energy through various methods such as financial incentives and behavioral change through education. Usually, the goal of demand side management is to encourage the consumer to use less energy during peak hours, or to move the time of energy use to off-peak times such as nighttime and weekends. Peak demand management does not necessarily decrease total energy consumption, but could be expected to reduce the need for investments in networks and/or power plants for meeting peak demands. An example is the use of energy storage units to store energy during off-peak hours and discharge them during peak hours. A newer application for DSM is to aid grid operators in balancing intermittent generation from wind and solar units, particularly when the timing and magnitude of energy demand does not coincide with the renewable generation. The term DSM was coined following the time of the 1973 energy crisis and 1979 energy crisis. Governments of many countries mandated performance of various programs for demand management. An early example is the National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 in the U.S., preceded by similar actions in California and Wisconsin. Demand Side Management was introduced publicly by Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in the 1980s. Nowadays, DSM technologies become increasingly feasible due to the integration of information and communications technology and the power system, resulting in a new term: smart grid.

Source: Wikipedia - Energy demand management