industrial global warming potential

Synonyms

GWP,

Definition

A factor used to calculate the cumulative radiative forcing impact of multiple specific (GWP) GHGs in a comparable way (WRI, 2013); The GHG Protocol defines a global warming potential (GWP) as “A factor describing the radiative forcing impact (degree of harm to the atmosphere) of one unit of a given GHG relative to one unit of CO2.” By using GWPs, GHG emissions can be standardized to a carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e). GWPs allow the effect of different GHGs to be expressed using carbon dioxide as a reference. For example, the impact on the atmosphere of one unit of methane over a 100-year time span is 21 times greater than one unit of CO2 (according to the IPCC’s second assessment report). Hence, methane’s global warming potential (GWP) over a 100-year period is 21. Estimates of GWPs have changed over time as scientific understanding has developed. However, for the sake of consistency, the parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change are continuing to use the GWPs from the Second Assessment Report (“SAR”) from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. As the GWPs from the SAR are used as the basis for international negotiations under the Kyoto Protocol, CDP also recommends that they be used for disclosing GHG emissions in response to the CDP information request. For those gases not assigned a GWP in the Second Assessment Report, please use the latest GWPs given in the Fourth Assessment Report. Please explain the source of the GWPs you are using. The Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) gives the latest GWP values as well as GWPs from the Second Assessment Report (SAR). Go to table 2.14, page 212, in Chapter 2 of Working Group 1’s report, available from the IPCC website. GWPs are expressed over a number of different time frames. Please use the factors that give the GWP over a 100-year time span. For gases without a value in the SAR column, please use the 100-year value in the seventh column of table 2.14. (CDP, 2014)

A factor used to calculate the cumulative radiative forcing impact of multiple specific (GWP) GHGs in a comparable way (WRI, 2013); The GHG Protocol defines a global warming potential (GWP) as ?A factor describing the radiative forcing impact (degree of harm to the atmosphere) of one unit of a given GHG relative to one unit of CO2.? By using GWPs, GHG emissions can be standardized to a carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-e). GWPs allow the effect of different GHGs to be expressed using carbon dioxide as a reference. For example, the impact on the atmosphere of one unit of methane over a 100-year time span is 21 times greater than one unit of CO2 (according to the IPCC?s second assessment report). Hence, methane?s global warming potential (GWP) over a 100-year period is 21. Estimates of GWPs have changed over time as scientific understanding has developed. However, for the sake of consistency, the parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change are continuing to use the GWPs from the Second Assessment Report (?SAR?) from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. As the GWPs from the SAR are used as the basis for international negotiations under the Kyoto Protocol, CDP also recommends that they be used for disclosing GHG emissions in response to the CDP information request. For those gases not assigned a GWP in the Second Assessment Report, please use the latest GWPs given in the Fourth Assessment Report. Please explain the source of the GWPs you are using. The Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) gives the latest GWP values as well as GWPs from the Second Assessment Report (SAR). Go to table 2.14, page 212, in Chapter 2 of Working Group 1?s report, available from the IPCC website. GWPs are expressed over a number of different time frames. Please use the factors that give the GWP over a 100-year time span. For gases without a value in the SAR column, please use the 100-year value in the seventh column of table 2.14. (CDP, 2014)

Broader terms

global warming potential