Slovenia (2012)

Degree of reliance on imported energy: 

<p>
Slovenia has few indigenous resources of oil and gas.&nbsp; Therefore, it is highly dependent on energy imports, which account for more than 50% of the total energy supply.&nbsp; In 2005 total consumption of natural gas in Slovenia was 1.1 million m3. Geoplin, the national gas company, purchased this gas through long-term contracts from Russia (52%), Algeria (31%) and Austria (17%). Domestic production is negligible (0.3%).&nbsp; All Geoplin&rsquo;s gas sales are conducted under long-term supply contracts, most of which were renegotiated in 2007. 100% of the supply of petroleum products to Slovenia is imported. In 2009, the country imported 6.16 TWh of electricity.<br />
<br />
The imports/exports balance by energy source in 2009 was as follows (all units ktoe):&nbsp;<br />
Solid Fuel: 257 / 3.10<br />
Oil Products: 3069.9/ 487.8<br />
Natural Gas: 827.6/ 0.0<br />
Electricity: 528.5/ 791.7<br />
Combustible Renewables and Waste: 18.0 / 0.0<br />
&nbsp;</p>

Main sources of Energy: 

<p>
Total installed electricity capacity (2008, source: Enerdata): 3,200 MW</p>
<p>
- Thermal: 48%</p>
<p>
- Hydroelectric: 31%</p>
<p>
- Nuclear: 21%</p>
<p>
Slovenia has limited energy resources (mainly coal, lignite and hydroelectricity). Coal is of major importance in Slovenia both for heating and electricity generation. The Kr&scaron;ko NPP, co-owned by the Slovenian state electricity company ELES and Croatia&rsquo;s HEP, is an important source of power for the country.</p>
<p>
The use of natural gas is becoming more popular, and its use is expanding rapidly.</p>
<p>
Share of Total Primary Energy Supply* (2009, source: IEA): 7 Mtoe &nbsp;</p>
<p>
Oil: 35.6%</p>
<p>
Natural Gas: 11.5%</p>
<p>
Nuclear: 20.7%</p>
<p>
Hydroelectric: 5.6%</p>
<p>
Biofuels and Waste: 6.9%</p>
<p>
Coal and Peat: 19.7%</p>
<p>
*Share of TPES excludes electricity trade</p>
<br />
<p>
The electricity production by fuel source type in 2009 was as follows (source: Enerdata): &nbsp;</p>
<p>
Nuclear: 38%</p>
<p>
Coal and Lignite: 34%</p>
<p>
Hydroelectric: 24%</p>
<p>
Natural Gas: 3%</p>
<p>
Biomass and others: 1%</p>

Country: 

Slovenia

Extent of the network: 

<p>
National electrification rate (2000): 99 %<br />
<br />
Slovenia participated in the UCTE since 1975, and continues to participate in the ENTSO-E. The country has strong connections with neighbouring countries, including 2x400 kV and 1x220 kV lines to Austria, 1x400 kV and 1x220 kV lines to Italy, and 3x400 kV and 2x220 kV lines to Croatia. The planned link to Hungary, if undertaken, will serve not just to tap other export sources but also to provide an additional infrastructure support to the eastward expansion of the EU Internal Electricity Market. Slovenia plays an important role in the European electricity market, primarily due to its strategic location. The domestic transmission network consists of 508 km of 400 kV lines, 328 km of 220 kV lines, and 1,736 km of 110 kV lines.<br />
&nbsp;</p>

Capacity concerns: 

<p>
Slovenia has few naturally-occurring energy sources, mainly sub-bituminous coal and lignite, and the hydro-electric potential of the country is not being fully utilised. Also, the country&#39;s only oil refinery ceased to operate in 2000, leading to a greater reliance on imported oil and oil products. The primary energy demand of Slovenia is rising, indicating that future developments in generation capacity must be made. 71.5% of the TPES of Slovenia in 2008 came from imported sources, predominantly petroleum products.</p>

Potential for Renewable Energy: 

<p>
With a share of 9.2%, Slovenia has the fifth highest share of renewables in the primary energy balance in Europe. The average in the EU is 6%. The renewables contribute to the electricity production with a share of 30.6% placing Slovenia in the fourth place; the EU average is 13.9%.<br />
<br />
<u>Hydro power </u><br />
Slovenia&rsquo;s generation capacity from renewable energy resources is mainly from hydro, representing 28.7% of the total electricity production in 2009. Hydropower plants have the largest share among the RE sources in Slovenia and the largest potential for development. Besides the large hydroelectric generating units (eight large hydroelectric plants in the Slovenian Drava river cascade), there are approximately 400 small units (2006) with a total capacity of 85MW. Refurbishment of existing small scale hydropower, and increasing the capacity of the large-scale units, are part of the Slovenian renewable energy strategy. The technically feasible hydropower potential of the Slovenia is estimated 8,800 GWh/yr, of which a third has currently been exploited. An additional 40 MW of small hydro capacity is also estimated to be unexploited.<br />
<br />
<u>Biomass energy</u><br />
Forests cover more than 56% of the Slovenian territory. Use of biomass represents a sizeable market for the agricultural and forestry sectors, as well as for district heating programs. 6 MW of CHP plants utilising solid biomass was installed in 2004, with a view to increasing this to 11 MW by 2020 stated in the National Energy Programme. Biogas also holds a considerable potential, with&nbsp; 6 mostly agricultural biogas plants with a total installed capacity of 3.4 MWel and 4.1 MWth are in operation . While there is a considerable potential for development of biodiesel, there is no installed capacity.<br />
<br />
<u>Wind energy </u><br />
Slovenian wind power is in its infancy, with minor installations present for recording purposes, as well as some limited use for water pumping/feed grinding. Average wind speeds across the country vary, but can be as high as 4.5 m/s in the Portoroz region. A large number of potential sites for wind power in the country are, however, situated in ecologically sensitive mountain regions, which are under consideration for national parks. Approximately 40 MW of wind capacity is in the planning process. The total estimated power generation potential for the country, as of 2006, was 600 MW<br />
<br />
<u>Geothermal energy </u><br />
The North-eastern portion of the country has the greatest geothermal resource (80-150 mW/m2). Installed capacity amounted to 49 MWt in 2005. Geothermal energy is not currently utilised for electricity generation, however, the potential for the country could be increased to 500 MWt by 2020. The use of closed-loop geothermal systems in the country has also increased, with 2.3 MWt of installed capacity as of 2009.<br />
<br />
<u>Solar energy </u><br />
Studies have shown that with existing technologies Slovenia can harness 960 GWh per year, which is about half the power Kr&scaron;ko nuclear power plant produces at the moment. Presently, only about three percent of that potential is actually produced. The total installed capacity of photovoltaic installations was 0.22 MW in 2005. Solar thermal installations amounted to 106,300 square meters in 2005, equivalent to a capacity of 74.4 MWt. Average daily insolation across the country is in the region of 3.0 &ndash; 4.0 kWh/m2.<br />
&nbsp;</p>

Potential for Energy Efficiency: 

<p>
Slovenia has continued to promote a number of initiatives, such as awarding financial incentives, to improve energy efficiency.<br />
<br />
The Study on Energy Conservation Strategy in Slovenia estimates that potential energy savings in industry amount to 20% of current demand, with savings of 30% possible in the building sector.<br />
<br />
Primary energy demand in Slovenia is roughly 17% higher than the EU15 average. The potential for strategies such as demand-side management to be implemented is therefore present. Primary energy consumption per capita in 2008 was 3.83 toe. The transport and industrial sectors contributed most to final energy consumption in 2008.<br />
<br />
The potential for energy efficiency in all sectors of the Slovenian economy has been recognised in the National Energy Efficiency Action Plan. The total energy savings target for 2016, under the plan, is 4,261 GWh.<br />
&nbsp;</p>

Ownership: 

<p>
Slovenia&rsquo;s energy market was opened to all customers that had a connected load of more than 41kW on 15 April 2001 following the Energy Act, which is in line with Directive 96/92/EC of the EU.<br />
<br />
The Slovene electricity sector is composed of 4 generation companies, 5 distribution companies and 1 TSO.<br />
<br />
ELES (Elektro-Slovenija, <a href="http://www.eles.si/en/">http://www.eles.si/en/</a>), the Transmission System Operator (TSO) in Slovenia, is the public utility for transmission network management and is 100% state owned. As a national Operator its primary responsibility is to reliably operate the Slovenian electric power system and to offer quality electricity supply to consumers. ELES also buys electricity from the generation companies. ELES sells electricity to the 5 regional public distribution companies: Elektro Ljublijana (37% of the sales), Elektro Maribor (20%), Elektro Celje (19%), Elektro Promorska (15%) and Elektro Gorenjska (9%).<br />
<br />
The distribution companies supply all users except for five large industrial consumers supplied directly by ELES.<br />
<br />
The main electricity producers are Sostanj (<a href="http://www.te-sostanj.si/en/">http://www.te-sostanj.si/en/</a>) with 23% of the production and Dravske Elektrarne (<a href="http://www.dem.si/eng/">http://www.dem.si/eng/</a>) with 18%. The latter is owner of 50% of the nuclear plant of Krsko (680 MW), the other half being held by Croatia. In July 2001 Slovenia signed an agreement with Croatia to share the production between the two countries.<br />
<br />
Borzen d.o.o (<a href="http://www.borzen.si/">http://www.borzen.si/</a>), the Slovenian Power Market Operator is responsible for running the electricity exchange, clearing and settlement of transactions concluded on the organised market, maintaining records of bilateral contracts, drawing up schedules, accounting deviations, and publishing market movements. Borzen, which was previously owned by Elektro Slovenija, passed into direct ownership of the Government of Slovenia in December 2007.<br />
<br />
The Centre for RES/CHP support, incorporated in Borzen, is the support scheme operator for the generation of energy from renewable energy sources and highly efficient cogeneration of heat and power. In addition, in December 2009, the responsibilities for raising and managing the funds for electricity efficiency programs were incorporated within Borzen.<br />
<br />
<u>Oil Market</u><br />
Petrol (<a href="http://www.petrol.si/en/">www.petrol.si/en/</a>) is the national oil company. Its privatisation was completed in 1998 with the state still holding 15.6%. Petrol is responsible for the oil supply and the gas distribution networks; it has a majority stake in the refinery of Lendava, and has the most important network of service stations in the country.<br />
<br />
Istrabenz (<a href="http://www.istrabenz.si/eng/">http://www.istrabenz.si/eng/</a>) is a private oil operator and Petrolzemeljski a private gas operator.<br />
<br />
<u>Gas Market</u><br />
Geoplin (<a href="http://www.geoplin.si/eng/">www.geoplin.si/eng/</a>) is the country&#39;s natural gas supplier and transmission utility where the Slovenian State holds a 31% stake.<br />
&nbsp;</p>

Structure / extent of competition: 

<p>
The electricity market in Slovenia is fully open, as of 1 July 2007. Since the electricity market was liberalized that year, industries and households are free to choose their supplier of electricity. Distributors are now also able to set prices, something the government used to do in the past.<br />
<br />
Whereas a market-based Energy Act has been adopted in 1999, effective opening of the energy markets has not yet achieved. Separation of network services and production/supply is partial in electricity (full at the transmission level, not effective in distribution), and incomplete in gas transmission. The power exchange has not achieved sufficient liquidity and is recently nearing zero transactions in electricity auctioning. Market-based allocation of cross-border capacities started in 2007, yet the capacities auctioned are well below the physical limits, for various reasons.<br />
<br />
Unbundling is limited to accounts only for the time being. The Energy Act stipulates that transmission, distribution and operation of the relevant networks and supply of electricity to non-eligible customers are compulsory national commercial public services.<br />
&nbsp;</p>

Existence of an energy framework and programmes to promote sustainable energy: 

<p>
The Energy Act brings most of Slovenia&rsquo;s legislation on the electricity market in line with EU Directive 96/92/EC.<br />
<br />
The Resolution on the National Energy Programme (NEP) was adopted by the National Assembly in April 2004. The NEP deals with the supply and use of energy in Slovenia and defines the objectives of energy policy for the next ten years, to provide a reliable and quality energy supply as well as&nbsp; the diversification of primary energy sources, also ensuring a limited impact of the supply and use of energy on the environment. The NEP devotes particular attention to the promotion of the efficient use of energy and to the use of renewable energy.<br />
<br />
The Strategy of Use and Supply of Energy was adopted in January 1996 and gives a high priority to energy efficiency. Its objectives are to continue the restoration of thermal power stations, to construct new power stations, to increase the use of gas, to disengage nuclear power and to increase the use of renewable energies. It sets a target to improve the overall energy efficiency by 2% per year over the next ten to 15 years.<br />
<br />
RES investment subsidies:&nbsp; In the last few years the Ministry for Environment, Spatial Planning and Energy through the Agency for Efficient Use and Renewable Energy supports investments in RES and cogeneration by providing subsidies for investment projects.<br />
<br />
The National Energy Efficiency Action Plan 2008&ndash;2016 (NEEAP) was drawn up pursuant to Article 14 of Directive 2006/32/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 5 April 2006 on energy end-use efficiency and energy services, and repealing Council Directive 93/76/EEC (hereinafter: Directive 2006/32/EC). This is the first of three action plans. The remaining two have to be drawn up in 2011 and 2014.<br />
<br />
Eligible combined heat and power plants can also apply for exemption from the CO2 tax imposed by the government, providing they meet energy efficiency standards.<br />
<br />
The latest amendments to the Energy Act (Law No 70/08) give provision for the distribution of financial aid to renewable energy systems where production costs exceed the open-market price for electricity. This aid takes the form of a guaranteed purchase price dependant on the energy source, as well as operational support of the type described above. Investment subsidies for new renewable energy projects under the Agency for Efficient Use and Renewable Energy can be up to 40%. Guaranteed purchasing prices range from 18 &euro;/MWh for larger hydro installations, to over 300 &euro;/MWh for PV installations. By late 2010 Slovenia&#39;s regulatory authority was reporting that the country&#39;s feed-in tariffs had resulted in contracts for 1,100 MW of new renewable energy development, mostly hydro.<br />
&nbsp;</p>

Current energy debates or legislation: 

<p>
With regard to sustainable use of energy Slovenia set its goals with adoption of the Resolution on National Energy programme; in this programme goals are defined referring to efficient use of energy and renewable energy sources. The goals were to increase energy efficiency by the year 2010, to increase the scope of co-generation of heat and electrical energy and to increase generation of heat and electrical energy from renewable sources and to increase the share of bio-fuel in transport. Whilst the shares of all energy sources encompassed in the program have increased, the initial targets have not been met.<br />
<br />
In accordance with Article 14 of Directive 2006/32/EC of the European Parliament, the Second National Energy Efficiency Action Plan is currently in the process of being drawn up, and the progress report has been published.<br />
<br />
Relevant Legislation in Slovenia includes:&nbsp;</p>
<ul>
<li>
Law on Energy (1999 amended 2006)</li>
<li>
Regulation on CO emission tax (1996 amended 2002)</li>
<li>
National Energy Programme (2004)</li>
<li>
Decree on Prices and Premiums for Purchase of Electricity from Qualified Producers (2004)</li>
</ul>
<p>
<br />
A feed-in system and premium, CO2 taxation exists as well as public funds for environmental investments.&nbsp; Renewable Electricity producers can choose between fixed-in tariff and premium systems.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br />
&nbsp;</p>

Major energy studies: 

<p>
Removing Barriers for Wider Use of Biomass as Energy Source undertaken by the Agency for Efficient Use and Renewable Energy together with the United Nations Development Project (UNDP) and the Global Environment Found (GEF), which support, through capital share and subsidies, district projects that use wood biomass for heating.<br />
<br />
The European Renewable Energy Council have also performed a policy review on RES targets and support mechanisms in Slovenia in 2009, available at: www.erec.org/fileadmin/erec_docs/Projcet_Documents/RES2020/SlOVENIA_RES_... />
&nbsp;</p>

Role of government: 

<p>
<b>The Ministry of the Economy</b> (<a href="http://www.mg.gov.si/en/">www.mg.gov.si/en/</a>) has overall responsibility for energy policy in Slovenia through its Directorate for Energy headed by the State Secretary for Energy. It is particularly responsible for the preparation of the national energy strategy as well as for programmes to promote the efficient use of energy. Furthermore it is responsible for energy tariffs, legislation and exploitation licenses.<br />
<br />
<b>The Ministry of Environment and Spatial Planning</b> (<a href="http://www.mop.gov.si/">http://www.mop.gov.si/</a>) is responsible for energy issues since 2004.<br />
<br />
<b>The Ministry of Finance</b> (<a href="http://www.mf.gov.si/angl/index.htm">http://www.mf.gov.si/angl/index.htm...) has the ownership rights of state enterprises.<br />
<br />
<b>The Ministry of Economic Relations and Development</b> (MEOR) specializes in privatization, tariff and price control related issues.<br />
<br />
<b>The Ministry of the Economy / Energy and Mining Inspectorate</b> performs assignments that involve overseeing implementation of the regulation and general documents regulating electrical and thermal energy.&nbsp; The Inspectorate oversees whether legal persons or individuals adhere in their work to the laws, technical regulations, standards and other regulation governing the areas of electrical and thermal energy, the gas. And oil pipeline networks and pressurised containers.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br />
<br />
<b>The Environmental Agency</b> is a body of the Ministry of the Environment and Spatial Planning.&nbsp; It performs expert, analytical, regulatory and administrative tasks related to the environment at the national level.&nbsp; Thus the Agency&acute;s mission is to monitor, analyse and forecast phenomena and processes in the environment, and to reduce natural threats to people and poverty (<a href="http://www.arso.gov.si/en/">http://www.arso.gov.si/en/</a>)&nbsp;<br />
&nbsp;</p>

Government agencies in sustainable energy: 

<p>
The Institut Jozef Stefan Energy Efficiency Centre, founded in 1949, specializes among others in nuclear technology, energy utilization and environmental science. A significant part of the institute&rsquo;s work is to reflect on environmental issues. The Energy Efficiency Centre (EEC) within the Institute has the mission to promote sustainable energy development. The Institute is also one of the founders of the Institute for Ecological Research, an organisation that promotes environmentally-responsible practice in Slovenia.<br />
<br />
The MOP&rsquo;s Department for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (<a href="http://www.aure.gov.si">www.aure.gov.si</a>) is a part of the new Directorate for European Affairs and Investments (DEAI), and has responsibility for the implementation of EU-mandated programs, as well as the promotion of sectoral energy efficiency measures and new renewable energy projects.&nbsp;<br />
&nbsp;</p>

Energy planning procedures: 

<p>
The NEP incorporates analysis of two energy policy strategies &ndash; reference and intensive &ndash; to promote efficient energy use and renewable energy sources. The reference strategy assumes a continuation of the current measures and a strengthening of their implementation with the aim of meeting the EU requirements, while the intensive strategy assumes a more active Slovenian policy in the areas of efficient energy use and renewable energy sources in order to step up the transition to a low-carbon society, meaning that in the intensive scenario Slovenia will exceed the requirements to which it is committed within the EU.<br />
<br />
The NEP (Resolution on the National Energy Programme) defines the following objectives to have been met by 2010:</p>
<ul>
<li>
Increase the efficiency of energy use by 2010 in services and transport by 10%, in residential and commercial buildings by 10%, in the public sector by 15%,</li>
<li>
Double the share of electricity from co-generation from 800 GWh in 2000 to 1,600 GWh in 2010,</li>
<li>
Increase the share of renewable energy to 25% by 2020,</li>
<li>
Increase the share of renewable energy for heating from 22% in 2002 to 25% in 2010,</li>
<li>
Increase the share of electricity from renewable sources from 32% in 2002 to 33.6% in 2010,</li>
<li>
Increase the share of biofuels in transport to 5.75% in 2010,</li>
<li>
Increase the share of all renewable energies in final consumption in transport to 10% by 2020.</li>
</ul>
<p>
<br />
Slovenia is currently preparing the National Development Programme for 2007-2013 (NDP) based on the Development Strategy adopted by the Government in June 2005. This includes the Operational Programme of Environment Protection and Sustainable Use of Energy.<br />
<br />
According to the Slovenian Energy Agency, a total of 1,081 MW of new renewable capacity is in the development stage (including 870 MW of hydroelectric, 113 MW of wood biomass plants, 61 MW of CHP, 18 MW of solar, and 19 MW of other renewables), directly related to the improvements in the Slovenian feed-in tariff system as of 2010. Further incentives are to be implemented in 2011, including a 20% reduction in the reference costs of electricity for determining feed-in tariffs for new RES projects.<br />
&nbsp;</p>

Energy regulator Date of creation: 

<p>
The Energy Agency of the Republic of Slovenia (<a href="http://www.agen-rs.si/en/">http://www.agen-rs.si/en/</a>) became operational in January 2002. It acts as an independent Regulatory Body for liberalizing energy market . The Agency :&nbsp;</p>
<ul>
<li>
Opens up the market to newcomers by licensing new entrants and ensuring fair competition.</li>
<li>
Engages in promoting the development of RES in line with the EU targets, and carbon reduction strategies pursuant to the Kyoto Protocol targets.<br />
&nbsp;</li>
</ul>

Degree of independence: 

<p>
The Council of the Energy Agency is made up of a chairman and four members, all appointed by the government of Slovenia. The Government of Slovenia appoints the members of the Council following a proposal of the responsible minister. The Council elects the chairperson from among its members. Each Council member has a mandate for five years; Council members can be re-appointed after their mandate is complete. Funding for the agency is provided from the State budget, as well as the share price for transmission and distribution of electricity or natural gas delivered by the Government on the proposal of the agency.</p>

Regulatory framework for sustainable energy: 

<p>
All the producers of electricity from renewable sources can obtain the RECS (Renewable Energy Certificate System) certificates by certifying a unit produced. The Energy Agency prepared a proposal for the system of issuing guarantees of the origin of electrical energy from renewable resources. The proposal is in the process of being harmonised with the responsible ministry; after the completion of this process, an ordinance regarding the guarantees of the origin from renewable resources will be prepared.<br />
<br />
A 2010 amendment to the Regulation on Energy Infrastructure has allowed a number of small renewable energy installations, specifically for buildings (for example roof-mounted PV, solar water heaters, internal CHP), to be declared as investment maintenance.<br />
&nbsp;</p>

Regulatory roles: 

<p>
In addition to the regulatory roles of the&nbsp; Energy Agency (EA) discussed earlier, the agency also oversees :</p>
<ul>
<li>
the independence of system operators;</li>
<li>
the time needed for repairs on the transmission and distribution networks and for connecting to a network;</li>
<li>
the announcements of information on interconnections, network utilisation and the allocation of capacities, while treating all these details as confidential;&nbsp;&nbsp;</li>
<li>
the deadlines, conditions and tariffs for connecting new producers;</li>
<li>
the issuing of guarantees of the origin of electrical energy and commercial green certificates for the production of electricity from renewable resources.<br />
&nbsp;</li>
</ul>

Role of government department in energy regulation: 

<p>
The Ministry of Economic Affairs has the overall responsibility for energy policy in Slovenia; it is responsible for the support of programmes that promote the sustainable use of energy.<br />
<br />
The Ministry&#39;s Energy Supply Directorate is responsible for aspects related to energy supply, supply security, and harmonisation of energy related legislation, regulation and data collection.<br />
&nbsp;</p>

Regulatory barriers: 

<p>
The legal and regulatory frameworks need to be re-enforced. Whilst the frameworks are in existence, they are relatively newly-instituted, and as such have not had time to take a true foothold, or start having a discernible effect, on energy regulation in the country. As such, regular and consistent enforcement of regulations, and the following-through on current targets, will lead to an improved energy sector in the future.<br />
<br />
The independence of the EA is in fact questionable, as the government had intervened several times to prevent increases in the network charges proposed by the EA. It appears that in the former transition economies, the division of roles and responsibilities of newly created institutions is still not clearly understood and respected. This can be viewed as a learning-by-doing process which would eventually lead to the desired outcome. EU institutions as well as their good practices may help facilitate this process.<br />
&nbsp;</p>

References: 

IEA Energy Statistics (2009). Available at:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.iea.org/countries/non-membercountries/slovenia/">http://www.i... [Accessed 16th September 2013]<br />
<br />
Austrian Energy Agency Country Profile - Slovenia. Available at:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.enercee.net/countries/country-selection/slovenia.html">http:/... 16th September 2013]<br />
<br />
KPMG. Energy and Natural Resources. Central and Eastern European Hydro Power Outlook. 2010. Available at: <a href="http://www.kpmg.com/HU/en/IssuesAndInsights/ArticlesPublications/Documen... 16th September 2013]<br />
<br />
European Commission Website. National Renewable Energy Action Plan 2010-2020 (NREAP) Slovenia. July 2010. Available at: <a href="http://ec.europa.eu/energy/renewables/action_plan_en.htm">http://ec.euro... 16th September 2013]<br />
<br />
EBRD website. Slovenia Country Profile. Available at: <a href="http://www.ebrd.com/downloads/legal/irc/countries/slovenia.pdf">http://w... 16th September 2013]<br />
<br />
Energy Agency website. Tasks and Responsibilities. Available at: <a href="http://www.agen-rs.si/en/informacija.asp?id_informacija=859&amp;id_meta_... 16th September 2013]<br />
<br />
EBRD. Renewable Energy Country Profile - Slovenia. Available at: <a href="http://ws2-23.myloadspring.com/sites/renew/countries/slovenia/profile.as... [Accessed 16th September 2013]<br />
<br />
AGREE.net. National Energy Efficiency Action Plan (NEEAP) Progress Reports: The Czech Republic and Slovenia. Available at:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.focus.si/files/Publikacije/AGN_NEEAP.pdf">http://www.focus.si... 16th September 2013]<br />
<br />
WindWorks.org (2011) Slovenia 2011 FIT Update. Available at:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wind-works.org/cms/index.php?id=273&amp;tx_ttnews[tt_news]=85... [Accessed 16th September 2013]<br />
<br />
EREC. Renewable Energy Policy Review - Slovenia. Available at:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.erec.org/fileadmin/erec_docs/Projcet_Documents/RES2020/SlOVEN... 16th September 2013]<br />
<br />
M. Toman (2010) Key Features and Recent Developments of Feed-in Scheme in Slovenia. 8th Workshop of the IFIC, 18 November 2010, Berlin, Germany. Available at:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.feed-in-cooperation.org/wDefault_7/download-files/8th-worksho... 16th September 2013]<br />
<br />
Uradni List Republika Slovenije. Legislation. Available at:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.uradni-list.si/1/objava.jsp?urlid=201075&amp;objava=4122">htt... 16th September 2013]